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  • Writer's pictureAndray Voronov

What Science Says About Ice and Heat?


ice or heat for injuries

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Introduction


When you experience an injury, whether it's a sprain, strain, or aches, the question arises: should you use a heat pack or ice to alleviate the pain? As common knowledge goes, ice is used to relieve swelling and inflammation, while heat is used to ease muscle tension and soothe pain. But what does science say about when to ice an injury and when to use a heat pack? In this article, we will discuss what the latest research says about this age-old debate.


Understanding How Ice and Heat Affect the Body


To understand when to use ice or heat, it's essential to know how each affects the body. When applied, ice constricts blood vessels and decreases blood flow, which reduces swelling and inflammation, making it ideal for treating acute injuries. On the other hand, heat promotes blood flow and relaxes muscles, making it ideal for treating chronic pain.


When to Use Ice for Injuries


Previously, ice was thought to be best for acute injuries, such as sprains, strains, and bruises, where swelling is present. When applied, it reduces the blood flow to the injured area, constricts blood vessels, and minimizes swelling. Ice also helps numb the area, alleviating pain, and reducing muscle spasms. Normally, experts recommend applying ice immediately after an injury, and for the first 48-72 hours.


However, if you read my article on ankle sprains here, you'll notice that the most recent guidelines for acute injuries have now changed. In fact, the science is now questioning the use of ice at all because the reduction in blood flood caused by ice may be detrimental to the healing process.


These days, the advice around ice I give is that it works well as a natural analgesic (pain killer) and that's about it.


When to Use Heat for Injuries


Heat is ideal for treating chronic pain or injuries where there is no swelling, such as sore muscles, stiffness, or joint pain. When heat is applied, it increases blood flow to the affected area, promoting healing and reducing stiffness. Heat also helps soothe and relax muscles, making it perfect for treating tightness, cramps, or spasms. Experts recommend using heat after the first 48-72 hours of an injury, and when swelling has reduced.


Using Ice and Heat Together


While ice and heat are effective treatments on their own, using them together can provide optimal results in some cases. This technique is called contrast therapy, where you alternate between applying ice and heat to the affected area. Contrast therapy is best for treating chronic pain or injuries where inflammation has subsided. When combined, the cold and warmth create a pumping action that can flush out metabolic waste and increase blood flow to the affected area, promoting healing.


FAQs

Q1. Is it safe to apply heat or ice directly to the skin?

A. No, it's not safe. Always use a barrier, such as a towel or cloth, to prevent skin damage.


Q2. How long should I apply heat or ice?

A. For ice, apply it for 15-20 minutes every hour for the first 48-72 hours. For heat, apply it for 15-20 minutes every 2-3 hours.


Q3. Can I use a heating pad or an ice pack while sleeping?

A. No, it's not safe. You could get burned or frostbitten, and the temperature could change while you're asleep.


Q4. Can I use ice or heat for headaches?

A. Yes, it depends on the type of headache. For migraines, cold therapy may be more effective, while heat may be more helpful for tension headaches.


Q5. Can I use heat or ice for arthritis pain?

A. Yes, it depends on the type of arthritis. For osteoarthritis, heat may be more effective, while ice may be more beneficial for rheumatoid arthritis.


Q6. Can I use heat or ice for menstrual cramps?

A. Yes, heat can help alleviate menstrual cramps by relaxing the uterus and improving blood flow.


Conclusion


In conclusion, knowing when to use ice and heat for injuries is essential for effective pain relief and recovery. Ice is best used as a natural pain killer when an injury is new, while heat is ideal for treating chronic pain or injuries where there is no swelling. Using ice and heat together can provide optimal results in some cases. Remember to use a barrier to protect your skin, and avoid applying heat or ice while sleeping. If you have any concerns or doubts about using ice or heat for your injury or condition, always consult with a medical professional.


If you'd like to make an appointment with a Narre Warren Osteo, our clinic is called Gravity Osteopathy and we're located on Cranbourne Rd, Narre Warren. You can make an appointment by visiting www.gravityosteo.com/book or sending us an email at andray@gravityosteo.com.au


See you in the clinic soon

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